Abacus Method Validated by Research

In the very beginning, Supermaths was about teaching mathematics using the Abacus method and nothing has changed.

We are of the firm belief that the Abacus is the most effective way to learns maths which has now been backed up by independent scientific research.

Children who learn maths using the Abacus have been shown to perform better in many aspects of life.

We’ve had so much success that we are now offering the opportunity for children to take our Abacus Maths Classes Online. This means that anyone not local to Glasgow can still be a student at Supermaths regardless of where they are in the country. We also offer the online courses locally so even if you live right around the corner from Firhill, where we’re based, your child can still study online. It’s your choice.

Introduction to Abacus Mathematics

So you can take the course online, that’s great. However, you probably want to know what the abacus method is.

Put simply, the Abacus Method is a system of mental calculations based on visualising an abacus. An Abacus is an ancient tool with origins in Greece that consists of several rows of beads grouped in tens and mounted on a frame. Calculations are made by moving the beads around that represent the various numbers in the calculation.

Even though abaci have existed for thousands of years, almost no one owns one which isn’t an issue for Supermaths courses. The Abacus method doesn’t require any extra equipment with abaci supplied for beginners. Then, when the child is comfortable we will teach them to visualise the tool in their heads using their fingers to manipulate the imaginary beads.

You can see what this looks like below, where some of our students appeared on ITV show “Little Big Shots” to show off their skills.

 

Sources:

  1. Vox – https://www.vox.com/first-person/2017/3/6/14766970/abacus-maths-learning-lessons
  2. University of California – https://static1.squarespace.com/static/55d8de91e4b0dd59bc96a7e5/t/55f7331fe4b05d1cc7c988f4/1442263892128/Barner+et+al.+%28in+press%29.pdf
  3. Shuzan – http://www.shuzan.jp/english/brain/brain.html